Announcing the 2012 Edition of Molly’s Imaginary Summer Book Club

Full name: Molly’s Imaginary Summer Book Club Featuring Classics of Women’s Literature Defined As Books Authored By, About or Widely Read By Women in the 20th Century, But Published Before 1980, Because I Have To Put Some Sort of Guidelines In There, People!

This year’s titles are:

Kings Row by Henry Bellamann  Constantly recommended by Amazon’s robots for fans of Peyton Place. (June)

It by Elinor Glyn*  “Ava was young and slender and proud. And she had It. It, hell; she had Those.” –Dorothy Parker in her review of the book for The New Yorker, 1927.  (July)

Mommie Dearest by Christina Crawford  I am already on Joan’s side, as I am reminded every time the dry cleaning comes home on wire hangers. They are the worst. (August)

Looking For Mr. Goodbar by Judith Rossner  A strobe light is pretty much the worst gift an ex-boyfriend can give you. (September)

*(Long out-of-print, but look for the Barbara Cartland’s Library of Love paperback edition from the 1970s)

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11 Responses to Announcing the 2012 Edition of Molly’s Imaginary Summer Book Club

  1. Rachael says:

    I am ridiculously excited. I have already ordered King’s Row. I wonder which rural library it will come from? I had to search “all books-all libraries” to get it!

    • mondomolly says:

      I got my copy at the antique store on Main St. in Brockport- the proprietress seemed slightly concerned at my level of enthusiasm over finding it 🙂

  2. Kings Row is in! Picking it up this weekend!

  3. Pingback: Checking In With The Imaginary Summer Book Club: Kings Row (Sam Wood, 1942) | Lost Classics of Teen Lit, 1939-1989

  4. Pingback: Checking in with the Imaginary Summer Book Club: Kings Row (1942, Sam Wood) | Lost Classics of Teen Lit, 1939-1989

  5. Pingback: Checking in with the Imaginary Summer Book Club: It (1927, Clarence Badger) | Lost Classics of Teen Lit, 1939-1989

  6. Pingback: Checking in with the Imaginary Summer Book Club: Mommie Dearest (Frank Perry, 1981) | Lost Classics of Teen Lit, 1939-1989

  7. Pingback: Wrapping Up the Imaginary Summer Book Club: Looking For Mr. Goodbar (Richard Brooks, 1977) | Lost Classics of Teen Lit, 1939-1989

  8. Shawn Cullen says:

    I’m a few years late on this one, but I love “Kings Row”, both novel and film. A few years back there was a lot of attention being paid to “Peyton Place”, I think because it was the anniversary of the publication. I had never read it, so I tracked down a copy. And I was shocked (SHOCKED I tell you!) to find the at the entire first section of “Peyton Place”, the part about the school teacher and her view over the town and its inhabitants is directly plagiarized from “Kings Row”! I mean to the extent that Henry Bellaman’s estate (he was dead by the time “Peyton Place” was published) should have sued the author and publishers of ‘Peyton Place” for copyright infringement.

    Grace Metalious has gotten a fair amount of attention as an overlooked woman author, some of which may be fair, although there have always been allegations that she really didn’t write all of “Peyton Place”, at least not with a lot of help. I have to say, realizing that she literally cribbed an entire section of “Kings Row” for her own novel, I’m tending to lean toward the “she didn’t write her novel by herself” school of thought. It’s almost as if her editor said “You need a better opening. Here, copy this! ” and handed her “Kings Row”.

    • mondomolly says:

      LOL, thanks for your comment! An old friend of my family apparently worked for Metalious’s publisher back in the 60s and reports that calling her “eccentric” would be putting it mildly 😉

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